Category Archives: Prevention

College Bound – Wishing our Ambassadors an Amazing Experience !

We have been so fortunate to know Sean Rowell and Madeline Uretsky at the BIA-MA. They are both amazing people and have been wonderful additions to our Ambassador Program. If you have not heard about our Ambassador Program it is comprised of  volunteer speakers who have either sustained a brain injury or have a loved one with a brain injury. The speakers vary in age and experience, but all share a desire to tell their stories to help others avoid this devastating tragedy. Sean and Madeline have both been part of our are program after they sustained their injuries.

If you would like to become an Ambassador please contact us at 508-475-0032 and ask to speak with our Ambassador Program Coordinator !

Sean Rowell_SlopesCongrats Sean Rowell !!

This spring Ambassador Sean Rowell graduated from St. John’s High School in Shrewsbury and will be attending Georgetown University.  Sean began speaking for our program in August of 2010.  Sean suffered his brain injury from a snowboarding accident at Loon Mountain.

Sean has made a number of speeches as an Ambassador.  This year, Sean was a panel presenter at our Annual Conference.  He has spoken to numerous clubs and organizations throughout the state, including,  the Worcester Rotary Club, Millis High School, Wilmington Rotary Club, Marlborough Rotary Club, Chelmsford Rotary Club, Stow Parent Teacher Organization and Fitchburg Rotary Club. The Wilmington Rotary Club invited Sean to also present to their High School Interact Program.

After his accident, Sean became certified to teach for the New England Disabled Sports Program at Loon Mountain.  As a coach, Sean guides guests in the snow sport of their choice on the mountain.   Through his assistance, Sean enables the students to experience the thrills and independence of skiing.

BIA-MA would like to sincerely thank Sean for all his accomplishments and association with our organization.  We wish him the best of luck in his studies and would like him to continue to be a friend of the BIA-MA.

Madeline

Congrats Madeline Uretsky !!

This spring, Ambassador, Madeline Uretsky, graduated from Bishop Fenwick High School in Peabody and will be attending Simmons College.  Madeline became an Ambassador for BIA-MA in April of 2012.  Madeline’s brain injury happened from a car collision and then five months later a severe concussion while playing soccer.

Madeline has made numerous presentations for the Ambassador Program.  In April, she was a panel member at the Whitehead Institute’s 2014 Spring Lecture Series for High School Students.  She has also made numerous presentations at many Rotary Clubs across the state including; Lynn, Billerica, Swampscott, Billerica, Tyngsboro/Dunstable, and Manchester/ Essex.   Madeline has also presented at our Pediatric Conference and was a speaker at the 10th annual Boston Acquired Brain Injury Support (BABIS) Walk.

In 2013, Madeline’s story was featured in the Boston Globe in an article on concussions and her story is also featured in many internet sites focused on concussions.  Madeline also wrote a chapter in the book, Concussed! Sports-Related Head Injuries: Prevention.

BIA-MA would like to sincerely thank Madeline for all her accomplishments and her dedication to our organization.  We wish her the best of luck in her studies and would like her to continue to be a friend of the BIA-MA !

kristine & isabellaLast year I started an online support group on Facebook called “Parents of Children with Brain Injuries”.  For the first time since Isabella’s Acquired Brain Injury (ABI), I no longer felt alone.  I have other parents that can relate to how I feel, what is going on with Isabella and they quite simply just “get it”.  As a parent to a child with a brain injury we are often misunderstood.  We are seen as people who only talk about brain injuries, we are seen as ungrateful, we are seen as overprotective, we are seen as mean for having our child go to therapy etc.  Below are 12 things we want you to know about us:

1.)    We want you to know brain injuries are an invisible disability.  While our child may look “fine” or even as they did before their brain injury, they are no longer the same child they once were.  Their brain injury has forever changed them.  Brain injuries can cause behavioral changes, emotional instability, impaired cognition, poor judgment and a slew of other things.  Trust me, no matter how “great” they look, they are not “fine”.

2.)    We want you to know there is no cure for a brain injury.  Not all the therapy, medication, doctors, sweat, love and tears will cure their brain injury or bring them back to how they once were.  However, we do all that we can to give our child the best possible outcome.

3.)    We want you to know we are no longer the same person we were before our child’s brain injury.  Some of us have literally watched our child die before our eyes.  We have witnessed horrible things and we have also seen some amazing miracles.  We can’t be who we once were no matter how hard we try.  Our lives are forever changed and as a result so are we.

4.)    We want you to know that if our child manages to briefly hold it together when we see you that doesn’t mean that they are “fine” or that we exaggerate.  An often time our child is so overwhelmed that the fall out is long after you have gone.    That pent up anxiety quickly turns to aggression, crying, panic attacks, anger, and many other emotions.

5.)    We want you to know that when you see our child having a tantrum, please don’t judge us or them.  Our child doesn’t need to “learn respect”, “get beat or get a whooping” or need to “stay busy to stay out of trouble”.  Our child needs love, respect, compassion and understanding.  Their brain injury leaves them with little control over their own body and mind.  When you judge us it only makes it harder.  Trust me we don’t enjoy the tantrum and neither do they.

6.)    We want you to know that we can’t just “get over it”.  We would love to move on in life as if our child didn’t have a brain injury.  We would love to go back to that carefree attitude, a life where this horrible nightmare never happened.  Unfortunately this is our reality.  Our entire world revolves around brain injury.  We talk about it in hopes that you will never have to go through what we have.

7.)    We want you to know that sometimes the things you say to make us feel better only make us feel worse.   Please don’t say “God only gives us what we can handle”, “I don’t know how you do it”, “I could never do that”, “pray harder”, “everything happens for a reason” or anything along those lines.  We have to believe that it is not God’s will to allow our child to suffer from a brain injury.  We have to believe that sometimes bad things just happen.  Along the same lines, if you were in our shoes you would find a way to make it work too.  We have no choice and neither would you.  It’s ok if you don’t know what to say to us.  We appreciate the honesty.  If you want to encourage us, let us know we are doing a good job.  It will mean more than anything else you could say.

8.)    We want you to know that we grieve.  We grieve the loss of the child we once had, we grieve for the future they could have had, we grieve for the innocence they lost, we grieve for the future we had planned for ourselves, we grieve for the impact it has on our family etc.  There is no set timeline on how fast or how slow we grieve.  Grieving doesn’t make us any less grateful that our child survived.  Believe me, we are grateful beyond words.  Grieving is yet another part of this journey.

9.)    We want you to know that we feel isolated.  When the rest of the world has moved on, we are still here stuck at what seems like a standstill. When our child’s brain injury first happened, everyone rallied behind us during this time of crisis.  As time goes on they fall to the wayside one by one.  Some fall away because we are not able to put in the same effort on the relationship.  Some fall away because that common ground is lost.  Some fall away because they don’t know how to deal with what has happened etc.  We may not be able to socialize like we once were; however, we do like to feel important and as though we haven’t been forgotten.

10.) We want you to know that we refuse to settle for our child even when medical professionals are asking us to.  Doctors, nurses, therapists, surgeons and alike can offer their medical opinion but that doesn’t mean that we have to agree.  Remember, at one point we were told our child wouldn’t make it and they did.  We were told that our child would never walk, talk, eat etc and most of our children do.   So when we are being asking to settle for our child, we just won’t.  If we settled in the first place, our child most likely wouldn’t be here or be where they are today.  We want our child to have the best life possible within their capacity.

11.) We want you to know we worry A LOT.  Will my child wake up/talk/walk/eat?  Will they die overnight in their sleep from a seizure because I was sleeping?  Will medical insurance approve or deny the treatment/therapy/medication that our child needs?  What will happen to our child when we die?  How do we fight the school system so our child gets the appropriate education with the right accommodations?  How to I protect my child from the cruel world who wants to judge them at every opportunity?  How do I keep my child from being bullied?  How can I get family/friends to understand that I want to be who I was but I am no longer that person and neither is my child?

12.) We want you to know that we often feel guilty.  Guilty for missing out on our other children’s lives.  Guilty for mourning the loss of our pre-injury child.  Guilty that we are jealous of other children without a brain injury.  Guilty for wanting or needing a break.  Guilty for not doing more.  Guilty that our child has a brain injury.  Guilty when they are in pain and we can’t fix it.

These are just some of the things that we, parents of a child with a brain injury, want you to know about us.  Our child is a survivor of a brain injury.  As their parent we are a survivor too.  We have seen things that no parent should ever see.  We have heard things that haunt us daily.  In a world that has only just started talking about brain injuries, we are sadly misunderstood as is our child.   We hope that you never have to experience watching your child suffer from a brain injury but should it happen, know that there are other parents just like you.

What would you want others to know about being a parent to a child with a brain injury?

Guest Blogger, Kristin Olliney, is the mother of 8-year-old Isabella, who suffered sudden acute encephalitis when she was just 4. Kristin’s bi-monthly blog, Mommy of a Miracle, talks about the trials and joys of raising a brain injury survivor.

Legal Statement: The information contained in this blog does not reflect the specific views of BIA-MA. This blog is published for informational purposes only. BIA-MA is not providing medical, legal or other professional advice with its publication.

 

Announcement of “Chicken Soup for the Soul Recovering from Traumatic Brain Injuries” written by Sandra Madden.

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BIA-MA Staff & CSS Authors (Left to Right) Barbara Webster, Helen Stewart, Kelly Buttiglieri, Sandra Madden, and Suzanne D.K. Doswell

 

 

The Brain Injury Association of Massachusetts (BIA-MA) is proud to announce that stories written by five of our staff members, as well as several Massachusetts residents affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI), were selected for inclusion in the new Chicken Soup for the Soul (CSS) book slated to hit bookstores nationwide on June 24th.  This new book is entitled Recovering from Traumatic Brain Injuries: 101 Stories of Hope, Healing and Hard Work.

Our Executive Director Nicole Godaire beamed with pride when presented with this new book.  “I am proud of my staff, having the courage to tell their stories to the world. I believe this book will become a valuable resource for families dealing with recovery from traumatic brain injury.”

The following are excerpts from our CSS Authors:

“This book is the quintessential book for those who want to step into the world of brain injury and is now a primary resource in the BIA-MA Western Regional office library.  It is easy to read, full of dynamic personal stories and exactly what we have needed as we attempt to explain brain injury to the medical world and general public.  Some readers will shed a few tears as they realize the life altering significance of TBI and others may finally be able to address their patient and client needs with a clearer sense of this silent epidemic from the voices of those who know.” ~ Suzanne Doswell, Western Regional Manager

“I am so very grateful to be a part of this book.  After reading most of the stories, I truly believe that this is the most powerful textbook about Brain Injury ever written.  It has so many different voices in chorus.  The harmony blends survivors, family members, caregivers and professionals into one song.   It is not merely academic jargon, but relates the experience and impact of brain injury through the heart.  It bridges the gap between words and experience.  I do not believe that one can read these stories and not gain a deeper understanding of Traumatic Brain Injury and have more compassion toward the people who live with it, in any capacity, on a daily basis.” ~ Helen Stewart, Western Region Information & Resources Outreach Coordinator

“It takes a long time to heal and rehabilitate from a brain injury, typically continuing long after your insurance coverage has ended.  It is the hardest work I have ever done but it led me to the most fulfilling work I have ever done, working with other survivors.  My mission is to let other survivors know they are not alone in their struggles and to encourage them to think about “How” they can do something instead of “I can’t”.   It is a journey, not a destination.  Never give up hope.” ~ Barbara Webster, Support Group Leader Liaison

“A few years after my accident, I ran into my neurologist on a plane, we were both going to St. Lucia for a vacation. I felt such pride and satisfaction in telling her I had graduated law school and was practicing law. I wanted her to know she should encourage patients to take small steps to accomplish their former, pre-TBI goals. She initially discouraged me from pursuing mine.” ~ Kelly Buttiglieri, Ambassador Program Coordinator

“Keeping a positive outlook has been key (for me) to not succumbing to the frustrating and painful consequences of TBI. Many amazing and inspirational people have come into my life since my accidents and I keep focus on this, the comfort and joy of these relationships.” ~ Sandra Madden, Administrative Assistant

Chicken Soup for the Soul was named by USA Today in 2007 as “one of the five most memorable books in the last quarter-century” and after 21 years of publishing, have sold over 100 million books in the United States and Canada alone. You now have the opportunity to bump that number past 100 million books by purchasing your copy of Recovering from Traumatic Brain Injuries: 101 Stories of Hope, Healing and Hard Work directly from the Brain Injury Association of Massachusetts. We are selling the book for $12.50 (this is lower than the retail price and includes the cost of shipping and handling) and proceeds from the sale of each book will help support our mission: to create a better future for brain injury survivors and their families through brain injury prevention, education, advocacy and support.

To order online, visit www.biama.org. If you are unable to order online, please contact our offices and speak to Sandra Madden, she can be reached at (508) 475-0032 or toll-free (in state) at (800) 242-0030.

When you receive your book, look for BIA-MA colleagues’ stories on pages 64, 86, 177, 310, and 361.  Stories written by other Massachusetts residents affected by TBI appear on pages 15, 80, 128, 195, 212 and 307.

Legal Statement: The information contained in this blog does not reflect the specific views of BIA-MA. This blog is published for informational purposes only. BIA-MA is not providing medical, legal or other professional advice with its publication.

Mommy of a Miracle: My Challenge to You…

kristine & isabella

Before Isabella’s Acquired Brain Injury (ABI), I had no idea what a brain injury was.  I like many others never could have imaged the journey we were about to embark on.  I had heard about brain damage but didn’t know what it meant.  What I knew about comas came from television shows; however, I quickly found out that real life comas are completely different. Television comas are often portrayed as a person lying peacefully sleeping with a wrap on their head.  Real life comas are far from peaceful; there are machines everywhere, wires attached to every part of your body and the person is often thrashing around.  When Isabella was put on a ventilator I remember saying I didn’t understand because her lungs were fine.  I was then told that your brain controls breathing.  When Isabella woke up and couldn’t move I remember asking why because I knew she wasn’t paralyzed.  I was then told that your brain controls that too.  We were quickly thrown into this world of brain injuries with so many uncertainties.  I knew nothing about brain injuries.

Over the last three years, I have come to realize just how often brain injuries occur and how little people know about them.  March isn’t a month that has the world covered in either green or blue for brain injury awareness.  There isn’t a professional sports team adding the colors to their uniforms like they do in other months.  Unless you have personally been affected by brain injury you probably wouldn’t even know it was brain injury awareness month. “Brain Injury is the leading cause of death and disability in persons under 45 years of age, occurring more frequently than breast cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury combined.”  Why is brain injury still a silent epidemic when it is causing this much death and disability?  In my opinion it is because we aren’t loud enough.  Our voices are not being heard.

The month of March should not be the only time that we in the brain injury community raise awareness.  We are all affected by the lack of research in how to effectively prevent and treat brain injuries.  We are all affected by the lack of funding to help support those who survive a brain injury.   We are all affected by the lack of appropriate services especially long term care. We are all affected by the lack of understanding that while our survivor may look fine, brain injury is an invisible disability.  We are all affected by lack of appropriate educational programs for our child survivors.  It only takes one person to make a difference.  Imagine what the world would be like if everyone knew about brain injuries.

What can you do to raise awareness?  Talk with your family, friends and others about those things that we know can prevent brain injuries such as wearing a helmet and using a seatbelt.  Educate your children not to ever drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol and to not text while driving.  Discuss resources that are available to parents and other child care providers to prevent a baby from being shaken.  Remind others to always have a buddy with when swimming.  Get others involved in looking out for the signs of a concussion or a stroke.  While not all brain injuries are preventable knowing how to best keep yourself and others safe can decrease your risks.

I challenge each one of you to not only raise awareness for the month of March but to raise awareness every day.  We are the voice of our brain injury survivors and the survivors to come.  It only takes one person to make a difference.  Let that difference start with you.

Are you up for the challenge?

Guest Blogger, Kristin Olliney, is the mother of 7-year-old Isabella, who suffered sudden acute encephalitis when she was just 4. Kristin’s bi-monthly blog, Mommy of a Miracle, talks about the trials and joys of raising a brain injury survivor.

Lessons learned from Isabella

kristine & isabella
Guest Blogger, Kristin Olliney, is the mother of 7-year-old Isabella, who suffered sudden acute encephalitis when she was just 4. Kristin’s bi-monthly blog, Mommy of a Miracle, talks about the trials and joys of raising a brain injury survivor. 

Sunday, February 23rd was Isabella’s 8th birthday.   Recently it occurred to me that when Isabella turned 8, she will have had a brain injury almost half of her life.  Another year older, we are still fighting to relearn everything and regain a sense of “normalcy”.  Let’s be honest. Brain injuries suck.  They rob you and your child of the simple joys in life like birthdays.  Isabella had been waiting for her birthday for a month.  We had the day planned for the three of us: her, myself and my fiancée.  We planned on presents, cake, decorations, piñata and her favorite meals.  What I didn’t take into account is that no matter how much you plan, brain injuries are unpredictable.  The after effects of a brain injury are long lasting and do not discriminate or care that something like a birthday is suppose to be happy.  Don’t get me wrong we had some great moments but as the day progressed things quickly went downhill.  It was heartbreaking to watch Isabella literally fall apart because something like a birthday was too overwhelming and too much.  She kicked, screamed, cried, hit and went hysterical until she would finally let me hold her.  My heart aches for Isabella.  I am choosing to hold on to the good moments that we had on her birthday and reflect on all that Isabella has taught me.

When Isabella was born I had no idea that this little person would become the bravest, strongest, most amazing human being that I would ever meet.  I had no idea that she would endure more in her short life then most in their entire lifetime.  You see Isabella’s brain injury has robbed her of many things in life, things that will never be ok ever again.  What Isabella’s brain injury didn’t rob was that will to fight, her unrelenting determination, her strength, her endurance, and the ability to change and amaze those around her.

Isabella has taught me heroes come in all shapes, sizes, genders and ages.  Isabella is my hero.  She has spent the last 3 + years fighting to regain her life and learn everything all over again.  Isabella lives in a scary world filled with anxiety, hallucinations, inability to express herself, loss of control over her body and mind.  Yet she tries so hard every single day.  To live in a world like Isabella’s and still have good moments that is bravery.  That is strength and endurance.

Isabella has given me the opportunity to appreciate the small things that we often take for granted.  We stop and smell the flowers.  She and I watch the sunset knowing Nana in heaven is making it beautiful for us.  We take the time to laugh, hug and just enjoy each other.  Isabella has slowed me down and made me see things that for years I never even noticed.  Life takes on a greater appreciation that most will never know unless faced with the same uncertainty of possibly losing it all.

I was already a determined person, seeing Isabella’s determination only makes me fight that much harder for her.  Isabella spent a day learning to sit up only to fall back over and then do it again.  I have watched her attempt to kick a soccer ball to lose her balance and fall.  Yet Isabella did it over and over again until she was able to kick the ball.  I have watched Isabella struggle to find the right words to read a sentence in a book.  Sometimes it takes 3 or 4 tries to get her brain to say the right word but she sticks with it until she reads the sentence correctly.  Isabella knows what she wants to say and she is determined to figure it out.  That determination is inspiring.

My wish for Isabella in her 8th year is that she will start seeing how truly amazing and awe inspiring she is.  I want Isabella to know that it is ok to be scared; doing it anyway makes you brave.  I want her to know that strength isn’t only measured with how physically strong you are but also by the things in life that are suppose to stop you and yet you overcome.  I want Isabella to know how very proud of her I am.  I love Isabella more with each day; her brain injury makes me love her even more.

Brain injuries suck.  They are gut wrenching to watch.  As a parent it can be devastating to see your child struggle everyday with things that once were easy and done without second thought.  I encourage you to find the lessons that survivors offer to everyone they know.  Cherish the moments and recognize that in an instant it can all change.

“Most people never get to meet their hero. I was lucky enough to give birth to mine.”

Mommy of a Miracle: Why the shame?

Kristin Olliney and her miracle, Isabella, making new milestones every single day.

Brain injury is known to increase the risk of some psychiatric disorders including but not limited to anxiety disorders, personality disorders, depression, substance abuse disorders, self injurious behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD), rage, aggression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the list goes on and on.  Both survivors and parents of children with brain injuries find themselves suffering from these psychiatric disorders as a result of brain injury.  These conditions and disorders are often hidden from others because nobody wants to look “crazy”.  Our society has taught us that having these disorders is bad.  We are often told to be strong or grateful for surviving.  Then we are shamed into feel like something is wrong with us for admitting that we need help.

As a result of Isabella’s Acquired Brain Injury (ABI), she now has severe anxiety.  The separation anxiety, social anxiety and general anxiety is debilitating not to mention completely heartbreaking.  Isabella wakes up every single morning screaming from a panic attack.  This is how our day starts.  Isabella doesn’t like to leave the house because there are “bad things out there” and she feels safer at home.  When we are home, the routine is familiar, the expectations are the same and it is pretty predictable but when you leave home there is a lot that can’t be structured or predicted.  If other people look at Isabella while we are out at an appointment, she immediately tries to hide in her stroller and she starts to panic.  Unfortunately, anxiety for both a brain injury survivor and the parent of that child is all too common.

Isabella suffers from auditory hallucinations and on occasion visual hallucinations.  Isabella has these constant “sounds” that she hears.    About a month post ABI, I found Isabella under our kitchen table rocking back and forth, shaking and screaming while covering her ears.  It was like right out of a horror movie.  Over time, she was able to verbalize what she was experiencing.  The “sounds” that Isabella experiences are similar to static, stomping, banging and often sound like Charlie Brown’s teacher (talking that you can’t understand).  They scare her.  Isabella hates to be alone because of the “sounds”.  The “sounds” are constantly there and at their worst when she is tired, sick, in the car, post seizure and at night.  During the day, I try to keep her distracted and we have set up noise machines to help drown the “sounds” out.

Isabella has no regulation of her mood, behavior or emotions.  When Isabella feels something (happy, mad, sad etc) she feels it very strongly.  Isabella can escalate to rage and aggression within a second.  It is like a switch goes off and everything changes.  Isabella has been said to appear to have the worst case of ADHD that most people have ever seen.   These symptoms are all too common for survivors of brain injury.   We have trialed many medications to try and help Isabella.  Unfortunately, medication has been unsuccessful.  Some medications cause Isabella to have a paradoxical reaction which means instead of helping her slow down it makes her race worse than she was before.  Some meds cause her breathing and heart rate to drop where she appears to be lifeless.  Other medications have no positive effect.  When you have a brain injury, medications react different than they would in a neurologically typical brain.  Isabella receives in home behavioral to help her learn coping and adapting skills.  While Isabella knows what she is suppose to do, applying the skills is where she can’t seem to connect.

Isabella has extremely low self esteem.  She can’t get her brain and body to work together.  As a result she feels stupid, dumb and sad.  Isabella tries so hard every single second of every single day.  It is heartbreaking to watch her continue to try and not succeed.   Isabella knows that before her ABI, things came much easier.  Now everything is a lot harder and as a result she feels negatively towards herself.   I use a lot of positive reinforcement with Isabella.  I ask others that work with her to use it as well.

When we hear of PTSD, we often think of members of the military.  However, PTSD is not limited to the military.  Some of the symptoms of PTSD include nightmares, flashbacks, difficulty eating or sleeping, etc.  Many brain injury survivors live with PTSD every day.  Many parents of children with a brain injury also suffer from PTSD.  When you see your child dying before your eyes, it changes you.  It changes your entire world and everything that you thought you knew.

Isabella, like many other survivors of brain injury suffers from psychiatric disorders as a result of a brain injury.  Parents of children with brain injuries can also suffer from psychiatric disorders because they have witnessed the unimaginable.  Often times people go without treatment because of the shame that often accompanies these disorders.  Brain injuries change not only the survivor’s life but also those directly involved.  It is ok to feel how you do.  It is ok to get the help that you need.  Let’s end the shame that is involved with these disorders.

Guest Blogger, Kristin Olliney, is the mother of 7-year-old Isabella, who suffered sudden acute encephalitis when she was just 4. Kristin’s bi-monthly blog, Mommy of a Miracle, talks about the trials and joys of raising a brain injury survivor. 

Think A-Head Redesigned and Revamped, Coming to a School Near You

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Students get ready for prom. Do they know the dangers of drinking or drugging and driving?

Did you know that the brain contains 100,000 miles worth of blood vessels–enough to circle the earth four times?  The brain contains 100 billion neurons, which are cells, known as gray matter, that process all of the information in your brain. Each neuron is connected to other neurons by up to 40,000 synapses. This means that the number of connections in the brain outnumbers the number of stars in the universe.

Did you know that the brain is made up of 75% water, and uses 20% of the oxygen in your body at any given time?

What a powerful organ…one worthy of protecting, since it houses so much information and capability.  However, brain injuries are the leading cause of death and disability in young adults and teenagers. The recorded instance of concussion, car crashes and substance use by this group is increasing. So, what can be done to enlighten students and give them knowledge, allowing them to make better choices for their own safety?

The Brain Injury Association of Massachusetts has a solution. Think A-Head is a dynamic, school-based program that has been teaching students to avoid risk-taking behavior and develop healthy living habits for nearly 20 years. This curriculum is tailored to the age of the students and to the specific needs of the school and its community. The program offers a core curriculum with amendable activities based around the following issues:

  • Brain Injury: General knowledge of the brain, brain injury, high-risk groups and behaviors
  • Drugs and alcohol: Breaking down drugs to include depressants, stimulants, inhalants and prescription pills and the affect on the teenage body and brain
  • Impaired driving: How alcohol affects driving, the dangers of impaired driving and the increased risk of sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Seatbelts: The benefits of using them and the detriments of not using them; statistics on usage and common misconceptions about seatbelts
  • Concussions: Focusing on sports concussions, signs and symptoms, and information on what to do in the case of a suspected concussion; the roles of coaches, student athletes, teachers and school systems in this process

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You may have experienced this program in your school before. However, BIA-MA has completely revamped the program to be a more effective educational and preventative tool. Your students will experience new presentations with interactive question-and-answer sessions to make sure they are really consuming the information. In addition, a brain injury survivor speaker will be on hand to discuss their experiences with brain injury and to also pose situational questions to the students. When reality is standing before them, how do they respond?

Thanks to a generous gift from the Sarah W. Rollins Charitable Trust, BIA-MA is able to offer this redesigned Think A-Head program at a discounted fee of $75 for the first program and $25 for each additional program held at your school on the same day. Think A-Head aims to inform and engage students and supply them with applicable knowledge so that they can make more informed choices during a most impressionable time in their lives.

Science has proven that neurons continue to develop throughout an individual’s life, at least in some parts of the brain. In addition, fresh cells are actively involved in the formation of memory. This organ should be protected, as it serves as the “engine room” or “control room” for all of your body’s faculties. An individual’s choices affect the brain on a regular basis.

To bring the Think A-Head program to your school in Massachusetts, visit the webpage today to book a program (or more!) and learn more about how educating students about the risks and impact of brain injury helps them make better choices. To book your program immediately, click here.